WHAT ARE THE TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR
AORTIC STENOSIS?

Treatment for aortic stenosis depends on how far your disease has progressed. If your stenosis is mild, medication may be prescribed to help regulate your heartbeat and prevent blood clots. However, if the severity of your stenosis progresses, your doctor may recommend replacing your diseased aortic valve. Severe aortic stenosis cannot be treated with medication. The only effective treatment is to replace your aortic valve.

Today there are two options to replace your diseased aortic valve:

TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION (TAVI)

TAVI may be a better option for people who have been diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis depending on their risk for open-heart surgery. TAVI (sometimes called transcatheter aortic valve replacement or TAVR), is a less-invasive procedure than open-heart surgery. This procedure used a catheter to implant a new valve within your diseased aortic valve. TAVI can be performed through multiple approaches, however, the most common approach is the transfemoral approach (through a small incision in the leg). Only professionals who have received extensive training are qualified to perform the TAVI procedure. A properly trained and dedicated multidisciplinary heart team at a TAVI center will conduct a thorough evaluation to determine the most appropriate treatment option for you.

 

OPEN HEART SURGICAL AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT

Aortic valve replacement through open-heart surgery is another option for treating severe aortic stenosis. Most open-heart surgeries are performed through an incision across the full length of the breast bone or sternum. Occasionally open-heart surgeries can be performed through smaller incisions.

Open heart surgeries, including those performed through smaller incisions, both require the use of a heart-lung machine that temporarily takes over the function of the heart. During the procedure, the surgeon will completely remove the diseased aortic valve and insert a new valve. There are two different types of surgical valves; mechanical (man-made material) and biological (animal or human tissue).